STATEMENT TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS
OF THE SAN FRANCISCO MUNICIPAL TRANSIT AUTHORITY
CF Welcomes New SF Director of Transportation Edward Reiskin
And Requests the Taxi Division Be Promoted to Second-Tier Ranking
September 6, 2011

by Christopher Fulkerson

CF's Composition Desk
Christopher Fulkerson Speaks
Simulcast Imagery
CF Speaks against "Peak TIme" medallions
and against SFMTA Misappropriation of funds
Meeting of the SFMTA Board, March 1, 2011
Photograph and Image Title by Ed Healy

CLICK HERE to see the videotape from SF City Hall
CLICK HERE for the Video Archive of the SFMTA Board of Directors Meetings


Right now there is a natural articulation point in the progress of things and I would like to use this as an opportunity to welcome Edward Reiskin, and thank the Board for giving the cab drivers a cost of living increase, though I must express the hope that the next one is in the recommended two years, and not in eight, and there will be no more politicization of the issue through grabs at more cabs.

Many present problems of balance and functionality would be solved if the Taxi Division were restored to its second-tier rank within the MTA that it so briefly enjoyed.    Finance and cab driving are organizations of too greatly differing functionalism, and whenever in any industry this sort of structure exists it is thought of as exploitative and unfair.    Right now would be an opportune moment to make this change.    There have to be some immediate effects of Mr. Reiskin’s tenure, and many of the most thoughtful people in the industry feel this simple structural change would be most beneficial.    Please promote Christiane Hayashi and her Division back up to their original position.

Mr. Reiskin, please do not accept the politicized formula that more cabs means better service.   Such a view is proof of a lack of understanding of the industry.    Please invest in “Open Taxi Access” and make San Francisco the first city in the world with fully transparent cab availability.
The cab situation is one that is very susceptible to improvement through technology, and no increase in cabs has made the geographic extremes of the City any more appealing to drivers.   Your predecessor removed Open Taxi Access from the table, yet the Taxi Advisory Counsel has now recommended it be reconsidered.    There could be no less intrusive way to improve service than to empower the people by enabling them to find all the cabs in San Francisco, all the time.    This “Google Maps of the Cab Industry” would cost only $400,000.    This is needed far more than the PC & N study being considered at $450,000, when we on the street already know that more cabs does not improve service.     What industry leader who would not benefit from more cabs is recommending in favor of this?   

************

First posted 12/7/2011.

HOME

PRINCIPAL WORKS

OTHER WRITINGS